11.11.2011

Down the Instant Rabbit-hole

          So I briefly mentioned a Fujifilm instant camera in my last post, but I had yet to test it out.  Since then I used my magic photo dust to convince the art department at the Groton School to acquire the Fuji Instax 210 camera (an amazing deal at $80, and a great gift idea!).  This shoots the larger Instax Wide film which is a slightly larger image than a 600 size Polaroid.  Each double pack of film gives you 20 beautiful instant photos at roughly one dollar per pic.


As of right now I am just past half way through my first pack of film, and I have already fallen in love with this system.  Here are some of my test shots:


Amazing depth of information in the shadows, and great texture!


I shot this directly into the light, and I get almost no flaring.

This was a pretty low light situation, but the film performs beautifully, giving a great range of colors.

Hooray for contrasty indoor flash photos!

As much as I love polaroids, the texture, color range, and detail in the shadows leave Instax film winning my vote, but that's not to say I don't love the unpredictable nature of the Impossible film.

       I couldn't enjoy shooting with instant photos more; I'm in love with the concept of originals, and there is nothing more real and original than an instant photo.  Once I figure out a good method of framing these I'll be putting them up for sale on our Etsy shop, but until then please contact me if you are interested (I make trades and I always accept cash. : ) .

I will definitely be shooting more with this shortly, but until then I hope you've enjoyed the tests.

 P.S. I also believe that the issues with my impossible photos were roller based, and not a problem with the film batch; when the photograph is ejected from the camera, the developer, stop, and fixer are squeezed into the frame from the packets at the bottom of the image.  Due to the fact that the cameras I was using were old, the rollers were probably not perfect, and did not uniformly distribute the chemicals throughout the print.  This probably means that all of my Spectra pics will come out slightly distorted, but who says that's a bad thing?


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